Ancient Roman Silver Head Fragment of Juno

$802.25

An Ancient Roman silver head fragment portraying the Roman goddess Juno, mounted on a modern agate pedestal. Her features are well defined and executed in a naturalistic manner. As her Greek counterpart Hera, the goddess here wears the polos (πόλος), a high cylindrical crown, first worn by goddesses in Ancient Near Eastern mythology, whilst her hair is tied in a low bun behind her head.

The measurements provided below are inclusive of the pedestal, the head fragment itself measures: W 1.3cm x H 2.7cm.

Date: Circa 1st – 3rd Century AD
Provenance: From the late Alison Barker collection, a retired London barrister; formed early 1960s-1990s.
Condition: Good condition. The head presents missing sections on the crown and a small hole on the back of the neck. The modern pedestal presents some chips and a repair.

In stock

SKU: MG-266 Category: Tag:

Juno was a leading deity in the Roman pantheon who, much like her Greek counterpart Hera (Ἥρα), was the principal goddess of the State, the patron of Rome and the Roman Empire. Together with Jupiter and Minerva, she was part of the Capitoline Triad worshipped on the Capitoline Hill, which integrated the Etruscan trinity formed by Tini, Uni and Menura, into the Roman religion. The goddess was also known as Juno Lucina and was regarded as the protector of married women and childbirth. Among other her other identities was Juno Moneta, a personage unique to Rome with her primary temple constructed on the Arx, next to the Roman mint on the Capitoline Hill. Both the words ‘mint’ and ‘money’ are derived from her name. Juno is presented in various guises in Classical art. Occasionally exhibiting military attributes, she is most often portrayed as a matronal and regal.

To find out more about Roman goddesses, please visit our relevant blog post:  Roman Goddesses in Mythology

 

Weight 74 g
Dimensions W 3.5 x H 8 cm
Culture

Region

Metal

Semi-Precious Stones

Roman Mythology

Reference: For a similar item, please see The Metropolitan Museum, item 96.9.390

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