Greek Hellenistic Spiralled Gold Loop Earring with Eros

$739.85

An exceptional Ancient Greek single hoop earring, made with spiralling gold and a delicate figure of the Greek god of love Eros on the front. Eros is standing with his hands on his hips and wings extending behind him. His body is curving outwards and his feet rest on the clasp so as to complete the shape of the hoop. He has a small sash crossing across his chest, decorated with small gold granules. The sash is a common attribute of Eros in Greek iconography, as it allows him to wear his quiver. A small daisy-like flower rests just above the deity’s head. Daisy-like ornaments and fillers were a popular decorative motif seen on many examples of fine Hellenistic jewellery.

Date: Circa 4th - 2nd century BC
Condition: Extremely fine. This earring is suitable for modern wear with modern hook or stud applied. Please consult a professional jeweller for any alterations.

SOLD

SKU: CG-35 Category: Tags: ,

Jewellery was used as a symbol of power in Ancient Greece, an outward way to express great wealth. Jewellery also served apotropaic and religious purposes. After the arrival of metallurgy, the Greeks began to create increasingly complex designs to reflect and represent the wealth and power of Greek nobility. Jewellery was enriched by precious stones and  modelled in the shape of goddesses and gods, as seen on this incredible example. In Ancient Greek culture and mythology Eros was the deity upon erotic and passionate love, known in Greek as ἔρως. He was the son of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of beauty, and was usually portrayed carrying  a bow and some arrows, with which he would have touched the heart of people and made them feel desire for each other. Moreover, Eros was often represented with wings outstretched with which he could gain height to aim his arrows, but which also represented the instability of desire, which could easily fly away.

 

Weight 1.95 g
Dimensions L 1.1 cm
Culture

Metal

Greek Mythology

Region

Reference: For a similar item, The Met Museum, item 74.51.3506

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